Snake Meadow Hill Church is a decent sized church located in Sterling, CT on Snake Meadow Hill Road, presumably not far from the Martin House. The church is also connected to the Gallup Cemetary. The church was once an active convent and hosted an orphanage. At some point, however, the church would become the location of several murders of young orphans and would eventually become a gathering place for a malevolent and violent sect of Satanists.

(Note: Some of this article is pure conjecture on the editor's part.)

History

1950s

In the 1950s, the church was a typical small town church with a congregation and orphanage. However, it was also during this time that strange things began to occur around the church, specifically in the large cornfield that it sat next to. During the night, strange and loud noises would emanate from the field. A dog kept at the church ran off into the corn on one of these occasions and was later found dead. Either the mother superior or a nun working there warned the children not to venture into the corn, but unfortunately, a group of six children would defy this request and enter the fields. They would later be found in various states of dismemberment, killed by "The Thing in the Field". Most of the staff would leave, and the orphanage would be shut down indefinitely. This incident would be heavily covered up by the Catholic Church, and the incident would fade into local legend.

1960s-1970s

Years after the incident, the church was being restaffed and eventually only one staff member from the days of the murders remained. Eventually, the orphanage was reopened and six new children would come to stay at the church. This was also marked by the arrival of a new nun, Miriam Bell. Bell was shown to be an extremely kind and caring woman towards the children but also exhibited strange behavior such as having the children dance in a circle around her. It was shortly after this that the previously mentioned old staff member was found dead, and Bell and four of the six children had gone missing. This time the Church was unable to cover it up, and the local police became involved.

An unnamed detective, who was on his final case before retirement, was dispatched to the church to investigate the matter. The detective worked closely with the church staff and head priest Father Clarke whilst staying on the church grounds for the duration of the investigation. While there was no sign of any of the missing persons, the remaining twins insisted to the detective that Miriam Bell was still present. When asking where exactly she was, their response was "ask her yourself".

One morning the detective awoke to find that four life-sized dolls made from sticks had been placed all around the outside of the church. The twins were obsessed with them and would stand at the windows staring at them for hours on end. They claimed to see Miriam among them, but the detective could never locate the missing woman. The detective then began having strange nightmares of people staring at him from the corn, their bodies painted completely red.

At two in the morning one night, the detective and Father Clarke were awoken to the sound of a bloodcurdling laughing noise emanating from the hallway outside the twins' room. Upon reaching the noise, they found the laughing was coming from a painting of the Virgin Mary. Another loud noise came, this time from the chapel. The detective and Father Clarke arrived to find Miriam Bell dragging the twins down with her into the church basement. Before the detective could fire his pistol at the deranged nun, Father Clarke stopped him, telling him that Father Clarke needed to confront the demon. Clarke descended into the cellar, sealing the entrance behind him. The detective waited outside, waiting and staying on guard while listening to the haunting noises coming from below him.

Whether or not the detective perished in the church that night, or escaped with his life, is unknown. It is known that shortly after this incident, the church was abandoned for a second and final time.

Gallery

Stained glass windows

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